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A Sleek And Chic Bathroom Makeover That’s Got The Edge


The original bathroom in this North Melbourne converted warehouse didn’t quite look like it suited the funky semi-industrial aesthetic of the rest of the property. So the owners decided on a revamp.

Owen Barnes, head designer at multi-award-winning Melbourne firm Bubbles Bathrooms who designed the bathroom with fellow designer Zacharia, says the owners, a professional couple, wanted a sleeker bathroom without it being too hard or cold.

The challenges included a complicated structural layout, which featured mezzanine levels and non-standard fittings, such as industrial-sized windows and doors.









THE RECYCLED OAK VANITY WRAPPED IN NON-POROUS CORIAN LENDS AN INDUSTRIAL EDGE TO THE LOOK.


“One of the key things we wanted to achieve was a semi-industrial look, without taking it too far,” Owen explains. “We made recommendations to the client on what could be achieved in the space and we worked with them to evolve the concept.”









CORIAN SHOWER NICHE


Owen singles out the vanity, which includes a large recycled-oak mirror, as one of the makeover’s best features. “We decided to ‘wrap’ the vanity in a product called Corian, a solid surface commonly used in kitchens,” he says. “The client wanted to use recycled oak, but by wrapping it in 12mm Corian, we created a stunning result – especially the shallow, organic shape of the basin. It gives the space a heavy, industrial edge.”

Corian was also used to create a niche in the shower. “We have worked closely with the manufacturer in recent years to perfect the process of using it in bathrooms,” Owen says. “Corian has no joins, so creates nice lines – and it’s easy to clean, which is always important.”

Also helping reduce cleaning time is the underfloor heating. The appeal of underfloor heating is normally all about toasty toes on a cold morning, but the heating also dries off the bathroom completely, which means mould doesn’t have a chance to grow.

Bubbles Bathrooms also put in an angled shower screen that is wider at the bottom than the top. The frameless raked-blade shower screen reduces the visual impact of the glass – and it’s stylish to boot.

The project ran on time and on budget, Owen reports. “Product selection and planning took between four and eight weeks, and the build about a month to six weeks, which is about average.”

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Written by: Erin Delahunty

Source : Herald Sun Home, 5 March 2016

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